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Tokyo
Tokyo

Tokyo enjoys a long history of prosperity as Japan’s capital since 1603, when Tokugawa Ieyasu established his shogunate and named the city Edo. Today, with a population of about 13 million, it has grown into the largest of the 47 prefectures of Japan and indeed one of the greatest metropolises in the world. Comprising 23 special wards, 26 cities, 5 towns, and 8 villages, Tokyo is the center of various activities in Japan including politics, economy, and culture.

Kamakura
Kamakura

Kamakura is an ancient city that has produced its own, original culture. Once it was a political capital along with Nara and Kyoto, and also the birthplace of Japan's first military government, the "Kamakura Bakufu." Warrior Minamoto no Yoritomo was appointed as Seii-Taishogun (shogun) by the Imperial court in 1192 and established the Kamakura Bakufu government, which is the first military government in Japan, whereas previously the Imperial court in Kyotoheld power.

Hakone
Hakone

Hakone is one of the best sightseeing spots in Japan with twenty million visitors every year. It is most notable as twenty five thousand tons of hot spring water and 20 kinds of hot springs. There is plenty of nature around to satisfy your outdoor needs. It has a number of museums, sightseeing boats, gardens and attractions. Our motto is to be No.1 in the number of hotels, the optimum number of rooms and finally the number of visitors.

Tokyo Asakusa Temple
Tokyo Asakusa Temple

Known for its old-town atmosphere and historic Buddhist temples, Asakusa is one of the most traditional district in Tokyo. The finest part of Asakusa is centered upon several blocks around the centuries-old Asakusa Kannon Temple, or Sensjoji, which itself is the main attraction of the area. Come and feel something of the old-world charm as the commercial and entertainment center for the townspeople of the Edo times, and enjoy the locals' lively lifestyle in this day and age.

Tokyo Asakusa Temple
Tokyo Asakusa Temple

Tokyo enjoys a long history of prosperity as Japan’s capital since 1603, when Tokugawa Ieyasu established his shogunate and named the city Edo. Today, with a population of about 13 million, it has grown into the largest of the 47 prefectures of Japan and indeed one of the greatest metropolises in the world. Comprising 23 special wards, 26 cities, 5 towns, and 8 villages, Tokyo is the center of various activities in Japan including politics, economy, and culture.

Tokyo Skytree
Tokyo Skytree

TOKYO SKYTREE was planned from the beginning to be the world's tallest free-standing broadcasting tower. After careful discussion and research on high-rise buildings that are being built around the world, it was finally decided on 634m, to become the tallest free-standing broadcasting tower in the world. Thus, the 634m-high TOKYO SKYTREE was recognized by the Guinness World Records Company on November 17, 2011 as the tallest tower in the world.

Tokyo Skytree
Tokyo Skytree

TOKYO SKYTREE was planned from the beginning to be the world's tallest free-standing broadcasting tower. After careful discussion and research on high-rise buildings that are being built around the world, it was finally decided on 634m, to become the tallest free-standing broadcasting tower in the world. Thus, the 634m-high TOKYO SKYTREE was recognized by the Guinness World Records Company on November 17, 2011 as the tallest tower in the world.

Tokyo Skytree
Tokyo Skytree

TOKYO SKYTREE was planned from the beginning to be the world's tallest free-standing broadcasting tower. After careful discussion and research on high-rise buildings that are being built around the world, it was finally decided on 634m, to become the tallest free-standing broadcasting tower in the world. Thus, the 634m-high TOKYO SKYTREE was recognized by the Guinness World Records Company on November 17, 2011 as the tallest tower in the world.

Tokyo Odaiba
Tokyo Odaiba

Odaiba is a popular shopping and entertainment district on a man made island in Tokyo Bay. It originated as a set of small man made fort islands (daiba literally means "fort"), which were built towards the end of the Edo Period (1603-1868) to protect Tokyo against possible attacks from the sea and specifically in response to the gunboat diplomacy of Commodore Perry.